Religion & Science

I just found this meme on Facebook:

Now, I like Dr. Tyson. He’s really cool. And I like the way he doesn’t put religious believers down just for being religious believers. All he’s asking is that you keep your religious beliefs out of the lab.

I wish more nonbelievers would take a leaf out of his book and treat believers with more respect and dignity, as he does.

But many nonbelievers seem to be completely unaware of how many religious people have long been part of the scientific world. I bet many nonbelievers would be completely shocked to know that the very father of astrophysics was a Jesuit priest, Angelo Secchi, S.J.

Or that the father of aeronautics was also a Jesuit priest, Fr. Francesco Lana-Terzi, S.J. I think many nonbelievers do not realize that for the last couple of centuries, Jesuits specifically have maintained a very prominent place in education and the sciences.

I think this may be because nonbelievers refuse to listen to anything OTHER than the popular mainstream media (which, in the US, has basically devolved to “infotainment”) which naturally is going to portray the most ridiculous of people (like the Westboro Baptist crazies, who seem to like protesting the funerals of our military dead as a way of telling the world that God is killing our soldiers because the US tolerates homosexuality) because that’s what gets headlines/lots of attention.

Geez.

None of the nonbelievers think to question the sources they get their information about believers from. Yet they think they are the ones who are so awesome when it comes to “critical thinking.”

Not only that, but the nonbelievers who blast the believers also have a very limited HISTORICAL view. They don’t look at some of the small, frequently overlooked details of the historical record – and if they had done so, they would realize (for example) that the mathematical formula that became the “big bang theory” was developed by a Belgian Roman Catholic priest/professor/physicist, Fr. Georges LeMaitre. I do not know if Fr. LeMaitre was a Jesuit, but he was a priest.

Such nonsense.

Anyway, here is an article by Fr. Tom Lucas, himself a Jesuit, entitled “The Illustrious, Embattled Tradition of Jesuit Scientists.” Puts it so much better than I could.

Advertisements

Tagged: , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: